On the revolution of heavenly spheres.

The Ptolemaic system of the universe, with the earth at the center, had held sway since antiquity as authoritative in philosophy, science, and church teaching. Following his observations of the heavenly bodies, Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543) abandoned the geocentric system for a heliocentric model, with the sun at the center. His remarkable work, On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres, stands as one of the greatest intellectual revolutions of all time, and profoundly influenced, among others, Galileo and Sir Isaac Newton.

On the revolutions of the heavenly spheres.

       On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres

On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres

Here again is another treatment—this time we’ve fed itthe first 10 chapters of Copernicus’ De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (Onthe Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres). As usual Wordle offers a very interestinginsight into word usage even though I was forced to limit the text selection toBook I and stop at the point where diagrams are used to illustrate thetext. Be that as it may, even in thislimited application, Wordle does surface some interesting bits from therelatively “popular” part of this revolutionary treatise.

Nicolaus Copernius, On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres講者:朱明中

The point that Dan Brown has tried to convey is that science is actually the proof of existence of God. This conflict between science and religion is centuries old. The ideas of Nicolaus Copernicus, a Renaissance mathematician and astronomer who formulated a heliocentric model of the universe (1543), marked the start of a conflict between science and religion that has dogged Western thought ever since. He rejected the Church’s idea that the sun orbited the Earth, and proposed that the sun, not the Earth, was the centre of the Solar System; also publishing a book about it, known as De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres), which was a momentous achievement; despite the ban imposed on it by the church.

On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres (2007) - IMDb
Of the classical astronomers, Copernicus is my favorite. He combines the best traitsof the theorist and the observer. In his treatise that in 1543 presented to the broadscientific public his Sun-centric theory of planetary motion, On the Revolutionsof Heavenly Spheres, Copernicus carefully develops his theory mathematically,and he skillfully marshals all of the available data in support of his theoryand in the criticism of the Ptolemaic epicycle theory of planetary motion that then dominated. The Ptolemaic system of the universe, with the earth at the center, had held sway since antiquity as authoritative in philosophy, science, and church teaching. Following his observations of the heavenly bodies, Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543) abandoned the geocentric system for a heliocentric model, with the sun at the center. His remarkable work, "On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres," stands as one of the greatest intellectual revolutions of all time, and profoundly influenced, among others, Galileo and Sir Isaac Newton.
Book Reviews On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres Nicolaus Copernicus

On the Revolution of Heavenly Spheres.

Copernicus commissioned Rheticus to publish a summary of his work in order to prepare the minds for his new revolutionary idea. was printed in Gdansk in 1540. A second edition was published in Basel the following year. In 1541 Rheticus left Warmia for Nuremberg taking with him a manuscript copy of (Six books on the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres) in order to have it printed in the printing shop of Johannes Pretrejus. Andreas Osiander a Lutheran theologian and mathematician was entrusted with its proofreading. However, Osiander did more then proofread the book. He first tried to persuade Copernicus to write a preface to his work presenting the new astronomical theory as a mere hypothesis, useful for astronomical calculations but not necessarily true. Copernicus rejected his request and by way of reasserting the truth of his system wrote (in June 1542) a splendid dedicatory letter to Pope Paul Ill to be printed as a foreword to the book. Nevertheless, was published with a which was for a time attributed to Copernicus.

Copernicus, On the Revolution of the Heavenly Spheres (1543), Book 1, ch 10

On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres, 1543 | galileo

The first-edition copies of 16th century astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus' renowned treatise in Latin, "De revolutionibus orbium coelestium" (On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres), have vanished from collections across the globe.

On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres (Great Minds Series) - Kindle edition by Nicolaus Copernicus

Randolph Mantooth in On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres

The Ptolemaic system of the universe, with the earth at the center, had held sway since antiquity as authoritative in philosophy, science, and church teaching. Following his observations of the heavenly bodies, Nicolaus Copernicus (1473-1543) abandoned the geocentric system for a heliocentric model, with the sun at the center. His remarkable work, On the Revolutions of Heavenly Spheres, stands as one of the greatest intellectual revolutions of all time, and profoundly influenced, among others, Galileo and Sir Isaac Newton.