Author: Mary Jo Maynes; Ann Waltner; Birgitte Soland; Ulrike Strasser

July brought perhaps my most exciting trip of the year, to Beijing for a presentation at the with University of Minnesota professors & students (Mary Jo Maynes, Ann Waltner, Qin Fang, and Yueqin Chen). Not only was the location memorable, but exploring it with those friends was particularly special.

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Mary Jo Maynes is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Minnesota.

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Mary Jo Maynes is professor of history at the University of Minnesota. Her recent books include (2008) and (2004).Ann Waltner is professor of history and director of the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota. She is a former editor of the and author of .

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Mary Jo Maynes is professor of history at the University of Minnesota. Her recent books include (2008) and (2004).Ann Waltner is professor of history and director of the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota. She is a former editor of the and author of .

Introduction: Gender History Across Epistemologies 1DONNA R. GABACCIA AND MARY JO MAYNES
In , Mary Jo Maynes, Jennifer L. Pierce, and Barbara Laslett argue that personal narratives-autobiographies, oral histories, life history interviews, and memoirs-are an important research tool for understanding the relationship between people and their societies. Gathering examples from throughout the world and from premodern as well as contemporary cultures, they draw from labor history and class analysis, feminist sociology, race relations, and anthropology to demonstrate the value of personal narratives for scholars and students alike.

explores why and how personal narratives should be used as evidence, and the methods and pitfalls of their use. The authors stress the importance of recognizing that stories that people tell about their lives are never simply individual. Rather, they are told in historically specific times and settings and call on rules, models, and social experiences that govern how story elements link together in the process of self-narration. Stories show how individuals’ motivations, emotions, and imaginations have been shaped by their cumulative life experiences. In turn, demonstrates how the knowledge produced by personal narrative analysis is not simply contained in the stories told; the understanding that takes place between narrator and analyst and between analyst and audience enriches the results immeasurably.author = {John Knodel and Mary Jo Maynes and Mary Jo Maynes and Barbara Anderson and Allan Sharlin and Steven Hochstadt and Karen Mason and Louise Tilly and Mirmiam Cohen and Michael Haines and Ron Lee},Mary Jo Maynes, Ann Beth Waltner, eds. The Family: A World History. Oxford: , 2012. xi + 147 pp. $19.95 (paper), ISBN 978-0-19-533814-0; $74.00 (cloth), ISBN 978-0-19-530476-3.Mary Jo Maynes is professor of history at the University of Minnesota. Her recent books include (2008) and (2004).Ann Waltner is professor of history and director of the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Minnesota. She is a former editor of the and author of .
Joeres, Ruth-Ellen B. and Mary Jo Maynes, eds. . Bloomington: Indiana University Press,1986.

Mary Jo Maynes (Author of Telling Stories) - Goodreads

Mary Jo Maynes and Ann Waltner have authored a tightly written and succinct, yet admirably comprehensive, survey of family as a theme in world history. The Family in World History is one volume in the New Oxford World History series, edited by Bonnie G. Smith and Anand Yang, and, if this volume is characteristic of the quality of others in the series, both the editors and Oxford University Press are to be thanked for providing teachers and students with concise and effective treatments of themes in world history that represent the best current scholarship.

: Mary Jo Maynes

Mary Jo Maynes is professor of history at the University of Minnesota

In Telling Stories, Mary Jo Maynes, Jennifer L. Pierce, and Barbara Laslett argue that personal narratives-autobiographies, oral histories, life history interviews, and memoirs-are an important research tool for understanding the relationship between people and their societies. Gathering examples from throughout the world and from premodern as well as contemporary cultures, they draw from labor history and class analysis, feminist sociology, race relations, and anthropology to demonstrate the value of personal narratives for scholars and students alike.

: Mary Jo Maynes

In Telling Stories, Mary Jo Maynes, Jennifer L

People have always lived in families, but what that means has varied dramatically across time and cultures. The family is not a "natural" phenomenon but an institution with a dynamic history stretching 10,000 years into the past. Mary Jo Maynes and Ann Waltner tell the story of this fundamental unit from the beginnings of domestication and human ...