Chinese/Japanese Archetypes PowerPoint PPT Presentation

anime version stays true to the general folk-tale of the little mermaid, and follows traditional Japanese Archetypes. The "all suffering female and weak passive male" (Barrett) is present in the anime version. The story itself is about the suffering little mermaid who goes through trial after trial trying to win the love of the prince to gain immortality. The prince is indeed a weak passive male; though he stands up to his parents, he will follow and obey their wishes. His parents went so far as to trick the prince into coming to see them in order to get him to go see his future bride. In the Disney version, Prince Eric is not at all a weak passive male, it is due to him that the seawitch is killed. He becomes the hero of the story.

Japanese character archetype meme - LiveJournal

Beautifully animated short that plays with many Japanese archetypes in Japanese mythology.

Megatokyo Forums -> Japanese Literary Archetypes

Even when not actively perpetuated, Orientalism persists as the default framework through which gaming depicts Eastern cultures. This presentation will cover three dominant forms of Orientalism found in gaming today. The first form is the exoticization of the East by the West, as from a fixed Orientalist perspective that can be found in Prince of Persia: Sands of Time, which tells a tale of the exoticized Middle Eastern Other through the Westernized Prince. The second form of Orientalism frequently found in games is the East's internalization of the Orientalist's fetish and its own production of Orientalism. Essentially, Orientalism acts as a two-way relationship in which the West consumes a fetishized version of the East and in which the East internalizes that fetishization and markets it to the West. Because the Oriental subject is founded on the exploitation of Otherness, the Oriental subject in turn allows an auto-exoticizing Japan to use cultural tropes and stereotyped icons to market themselves to a Western audience and to enforce a culturally imperialistic policy for Asia. Japan's continuance of the commodification of Japanese icons, specifically seen with the Samurai and Ninja figures, reveals the use of Orientalist perspective in selling games such as Onimusha and Tenchu that rely on distinctly Japanese archetypes. The third form of Orientalism found in gaming relies on both prior forms. This form is the imperialist and Orientalist stance that Japan takes in regard to other Asian nations. This form can be seen in the Japanese view of Chinese pseudo-history as represented in the Dynasty Warriors series. The series serves to illustrate the dominant position Japan establishes for itself within the Orientalist hierarchy.

Japanese Archetype - Free Japanese Archetype Software Download

Even when not actively perpetuated, Orientalism persists as the default framework through which gaming depicts Eastern cultures. This presentation will cover three dominant forms of Orientalism found in gaming today. The first form is the exoticization of the East by the West, as from a fixed Orientalist perspective that can be found in , which tells a tale of the exoticized Middle Eastern Other through the Westernized Prince. The second form of Orientalism frequently found in games is the East's internalization of the Orientalist's fetish and its own production of Orientalism. Essentially, Orientalism acts as a two-way relationship in which the West consumes a fetishized version of the East and in which the East internalizes that fetishization and markets it to the West. Because the Oriental subject is founded on the exploitation of Otherness, the Oriental subject in turn allows an auto-exoticizing Japan to use cultural tropes and stereotyped icons to market itself to a Western audience. Japan's continuance of the commodification of Japanese icons, specifically seen with the Samurai and Ninja figures, reveals the use of Orientalist perspective in selling games such as and that rely on distinctly Japanese archetypes. The third form of Orientalism found in gaming relies on both prior forms. This form is the imperialist and Orientalist stance that Japan takes in regard to other Asian nations. This form can be seen in the Japanese view of Chinese pseudo-history as represented in the series. The series serves to illustrate the dominant position Japan establishes for itself within the Orientalist hierarchy.

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Answers are based on Ancient Japanese Archetypes

on distinctly Japanese archetypes

“Like sumo wrestlers, samurai, shogun, and other Japanese archetypes, ninja are known outside Japan mostly by exaggerated and often fictionalized characteristics. The exaggerations include their black hooded uniforms and superhuman abilities like walking on water or scaling vertical walls. Ninja have been made even more cartoonish because of the popularity of the comic book and animation series Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. John Man helps rectify the misunderstandings about ninja, which is not an easy task as their origins and practices are in the shadows of Japanese history.”

the characters in the game are kinda based on classic japanese archetypes.

that the inhabitants and creatures originate from Japanese archetypes

The story is rather one dimensional, and it sings the same tune as many previous Tales games, about how conformity/class prejudice/racial intolerance/generic social evil number 4 is inherently wrong and how friendship/unity/belief in oneself/the power of love can overcome all of society's ills. Similarly, characters are cherry-picked from a basket of Japanese archetypes. I sometimes wonder what the Tales character designers do during brainstorming:

The prints combine American and Japanese archetypes and caricatures to drive the point forward

The Ultimate Way to Remember the Japanese Alphabet's Order

This was really interesting! Looking forward to whatever comes out of Anime Expo. One question I meant to throw in that wasn’t so on-topic – Ben did an interview with Nintendo Power and talked about RPGs and mixing Western and Japanese archetypes/ideas etc and I was just wondering if he had ever played a game he felt did that effectively. Thanks again for the interview, Spencer!