67 M ii. George Hewes was born on February 26, 1798.

Footnotes1 GeorgeHewes Recalls the Boston Tea Party (1834). In Henry Steele Commagerand Richard B. Morris, eds., (New York:Harper & Row, 1967), pp. 4-6.

139 M ii. George Hewes was born about 1845 in Illinois.

1. George Hewes was born in 1642 in

161 M iii. George Hewes was born about 1863 in Illinois.

The 20 day waiting period ended for the Dartmouth on December 16. On that day Sam Adams and his party tried to contact Governor Hutchinson to convince him to let the ships leave harbor. Hutchinson refused and, at five o'clock in the afternoon, the meeting of Boston citizens broke up. Some of them followed George Hewes' example, by dressing up as Native Americans. Carrying tomahawks and clubs, they marched to Griffin's Wharf. Hewes and his companions took great pains that nothing but the tea was destroyed and that no one profited from the destruction. "One Captain O'Connor, whom I well knew, came on board [to steal some tea], and when he supposed he was not noticed, filled his pockets, and also the lining of his coat," Hewes recalled. "But I had detected him and gave information to the captain of what he was doing. We were ordered to take him into custody, and just as he was stepping from the vessel, I seized him by the skirt of his coat, and in attempting to pull him back, I tore it off; but, springing forward by a rapid effort he made his escape."

george hewes, shoemaker and participant

At nine o'clock on the night of December 16, 1773, a band of Bostonians disguised as Native Americans boarded the British merchant ship Dartmouth and two companion vessels anchored at Griffin's Wharf in Boston harbor. The Americans, who numbered around 70, shared a common aim: to destroy the ships' cargo of British East India Company tea. Many years later George Hewes, a 31yearold shoemaker and participant, recalled "We then were ordered by our commander to open the hatches and take out all the chests of tea and throw them overboard. And we immediately proceeded to execute his orders, first cutting and splitting the chests with our tomahawks, so as thoroughly to expose them to the effects of the water." Urged on by a crowd of cheering townspeople, the disguised Bostonians destroyed 342 chests of tea estimated to be worth between 10,000 and 18,000. Their actions, which became known as the Boston Tea Party, set in motion events that led directly to the American Revolution (177583).

George Hewes
VOL. VIII. No. 4. George Hewes Engarving. Retrieved November 8, 2002 from the World Wide Web, Library of Congress.

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Samuel Cooper, just 16 in 1773, would go on to become a major in the continental army and fight numerous battles. George Hewes, age 31, had been injured in the after being struck by a rifle. He led one of the parties and wrote an account of the raid ...

The Boston Tea Party, 1773. Retrieved November 8, 2002 from the World Wide Web, . [George Hewes Eyewitness Account]

George Hewes - The Black Sphere

To teach the rebellious colonists a lesson and to show them who was boss, George III sent soldiers to America and imposed new taxes, including a tax on tea . So in 1773, in Boston, Massachusetts, some people decided to show King George what they thought of that tax. They disguised themselves as Indians, climbed on a ship in Boston harbor, and threw a whole load of good English tea into the ocean . An American named George Hewes recalled that fateful day: "Having painted my face and hands with coal dust in the shop of a blacksmith, I repaired to Griffin's Wharf where the ships lay that contained the tea.... We then were ordered by our commander to open the hatches and take out all the chests of tea and throw them overboard, and we immediately proceeded to execute his orders, first cutting and splitting the chests with our tomahawks, so as to thoroughly expose the tea to the effects of the water ."

-- George Hewes

George Hewes 1877-1946 - Ancestry

In Boston in January 1774, John Malcom argued with Bostonian George Hewes over Malcom’s rough treatment of a boy in the street. Malcom struck Hewes with his cane and fled the scene. Word of the assault spread, and Bostonians congregated at Malcom’s home, eventually dragging him outside. He was thrown into a cart and driven through the city streets. The crowd had Malcom stripped and covered first with tar and then feathers, giving him a “modern jacket.” The riotous parade continued through the city, stopping periodically to demand Malcom renounce British authority, which he refused to do. The mob drove on past the Liberty Tree, where they threatened to hang Malcom. They put a rope around his neck, tied him to the gallows, and beat him with clubs. Malcom, severely injured, was eventually driven back to his home and unceremoniously rolled off the cart.