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Another way to describe a scene is to pick one significant item and describe it. Perhaps the dusty lace curtains, or the stains on the ceiling where the roof leaked. Even better would be to show what the curtains or stains mean to the character.

Another few lines from the same work that describes a winter scene:

So, here are some adjectives we might use to describe a scene:

Describing a Scene in an Interesting Way | Bertram's Blog

If the description of the scene doesn't have a character - if a disembodied narrator is describing a scene for the reader's benefit alone - it will be much harder to get the reaction you want in the reader. That said, if you must do this, I would generally recommend using the diction that your lead protagonist would use in his/her mental narrative of the scene if he were there to see it.

Describing a scene in writing? ? | Yahoo Answers

[…] a Scene in an Interesting Way Describing a Winter Scene Describing a Winter Scene — Again Describing a Winter Scene — Again. And Yet Again. Describing the […]

So, here are some adjectives we might use to describe a scene. Some of them stay the same for both masculine and feminine nouns.
It seems as if this year we are getting plenty of winter. So, if you want to figure out how to describe a winter scene, don’t think of this a terrible winter but as a marvelous opportunity for learning how to describe a winter scene. The secret is to find the telling details — the sights, sounds, smell, feel, taste that evoke the entire feeling of the season. Even better is to find that which only you can experience. Icicles dripping from the eaves have been described a zillion times. (A slight exaggeration, but you get the point.) The crystalline aspect of ice-covered trees has probably been described as often. And so has that childhood horror of getting one’s tongue stuck to metal. But what about shadows on the snow? Rats. That’s been done, too. The trap even the most successful writers fall into when describing a scene is to simply list the objects in a room or landscape, and a few adjectives thrown about for color or texture do not make the description any more interesting. Writers often cheat by pretending to see the scene through the character’s eyes, but it still comes down to being nothing more than a list.One of the most common reasons people come to my blog is to find out how to describe a scene. A subcategory of that is how to describe a winter scene. I can tell you one thing: you do not learn how to describe a winter scene by Googling it. You go outside. Stand still. Observe.One of the search engine terms somebody used to find my blog was “Describe a Scene in an Interesting Way,” and I thought it would be a great subject for today’s post.We can also describe a scene by showing contrasts. Yellow is brighter when it is next to purple than when it is next to green. Green is brighter next to red than it is to blue. The color combination with the strongest visual impact is black on yellow. I’m not suggesting that we use color in such a way; these are merely examples of how one thing looks different when it is next to something else. Those dusty lace curtains may be in an otherwise spotless room. Or they might be scrupulously clean in a dusty room. Either way, it says more about the character than just describing the curtains or the room.Another way to describe a scene is to pick one significant item and describe it. Perhaps the dusty lace curtains, or the stains on the ceiling where the roof leaked. Even better would be to show what the curtains or stains mean to the character.
DESCRIBING BATTLE SCENES

Describing a winter scene | ESOL Nexus

The rumour apparently started in a review on the right-wing , which writes: "The new movie 'REVENANT' features a shocking scene of a wild bear raping Leo DiCaprio!" describing a scene in which DiCaptr

how do i describe a sex scene? | Yahoo Answers

Describe a sex scene? | Yahoo Answers

Thank you for this wonderful post. Could you give me some tips on describing a scene of book launch ceremony? I want to depict the excitement and happiness of the author after years of effort that was put for writing the book.

WRITING (112 ) - B1 - U6 : Describing a Scene (4) - YouTube

describing battle scenes | Best Descriptive Writing Sites

One of the search engine terms somebody used to find my blog was “Describe a Scene in an Interesting Way,” and I thought it would be a great subject for today’s post.